Philippines: Join Marinel’s calls for climate justice

Marinel Sumook Ubaldo was 16 when she knew she had to find a way to protect herself and her community from the disastrous effects of climate change. On 13 November 2013, she survived Typhoon Yolanda – one of the deadliest typhoons on record. It destroyed her village in Samar: over 6,000 people died in the Philippines alone and millions lost their homes.

Six years later, Marinel got her degree in social work. A nature lover and well-known youth activist, she spends her spare time campaigning for her community’s rights.

In September 2018, she went to New York City to give evidence to an investigation into climate change and the way fossil fuel industries contribute to it. “I’m not just… a climate statistic,” she told a packed assembly hall. “My story is only one of many, and I’m here to speak on behalf of the vulnerable and the marginalized communities – may our voices be heard.”

Marinel, her family and thousands of others who lost their homes in the typhoon need enough food, water, housing, electricity and toilets. The Philippine government has not done enough and has left them to live in unhealthy conditions where it is hard to earn a livelihood.

But Marinel remains dedicated to ensuring governments around the world confront climate change and tackle its effects on her community, and others like them. Support her.  

Marinel Sumook Ubaldo was 16 when she knew she had to find a way to protect herself and her community from the disastrous effects of climate change. On 13 November 2013, she survived Typhoon Yolanda – one of the deadliest typhoons on record. It destroyed her village in Samar: over 6,000 people died in the Philippines alone and millions lost their homes.

Six years later, Marinel got her degree in social work. A nature lover and well-known youth activist, she spends her spare time campaigning for her community’s rights.

In September 2018, she went to New York City to give evidence to an investigation into climate change and the way fossil fuel industries contribute to it. “I’m not just… a climate statistic,” she told a packed assembly hall. “My story is only one of many, and I’m here to speak on behalf of the vulnerable and the marginalized communities – may our voices be heard.”

Marinel, her family and thousands of others who lost their homes in the typhoon need enough food, water, housing, electricity and toilets. The Philippine government has not done enough and has left them to live in unhealthy conditions where it is hard to earn a livelihood.

But Marinel remains dedicated to ensuring governments around the world confront climate change and tackle its effects on her community, and others like them.